Reynolds Strategic Plan

About Reynolds

Reynolds Strategic Plan

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Strategic Plan 2010-15

Preamble

By 2015, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College will contribute to the economic vitality of the greater Richmond region and have a demonstrated record of student success as the provider of choice for workforce development, college transfer preparation, and distance learning.

Statements at the n.0 level, i.e., 1.0 College and Career Readiness, are college goals. Statements at the n.n and n.n.n level are college objectives for 2010-15. For each year of the plan, a companion document called the Operational Plan, contains strategies for achieving these objectives. 



1.0 COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS
Increase the number of students who are prepared for the rigor of the collegiate experience and, ultimately, a successful career.

1.1 Increase the number of incoming students who are prepared for the college experience.

1.1.1 Work with the service region school systems to enhance academic preparedness for college coursework.

1.1.2 Increase the number of underserved population students who are prepared for college courses. (Underserved population students are low-income Pell recipients, reside in specific geographic regions, are first generation college students, or are of minority ethnicity or race.)

1.1.3 Increase the number of students served through Middle College who are prepared for college coursework.

1.1.4 Ensure that distance learning students are prepared to be successful through readiness assessment and online orientation, by implementing the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP).

1.1.5 Increase the number of students served through Career Coaching and On-Ramp.
1.1.6 Increase the number of well-matched applicants who make a secure connection with the college by applying to JSRCC – “connection”.

1.1.7 Increase the number of students who make a successful transition to college – “entry”.

1.2 Serve all new program-placed students in an organized orientation activity.

1.2.1 Serve 80% of all new program-placed students in Student Orientation, Advising, and Registration (SOAR) sessions and group advising.

1.2.2 Redefine and utilize online orientation as a technology training resource for new students on how to use the Student Information System, Blackboard, and electronic communications.

1.2.3 Develop and implement alternative programs that meet the needs of students who do not participate in other organized orientation programs, such as SOAR, group advising, or school-specific orientation programs.

1.2.4 Establish a program designed to assist veteran students with their transition into the college.

1.3 Improve and promote orientation tools and services for new non-curricular students.

1.3.1 Redefine and utilize online orientation to serve all new non-curricular students.

1.3.2 Develop and implement a new-student website that incorporates tools such as online orientation, Virginia Education Wizard, etc.

1.3.3 Develop and implement a marketing plan targeted to new non-curricular students, directing them to the new website, encouraging them to take advantage of online orientation and other available services, and promoting the benefits of program placement.

1.4 Ensure that prospective students have the tools and knowledge to select the most appropriate program and career.


2.0 STUDENT SUCCESS
Increase the number of students who are successful in college courses and programs and who have acquired the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to achieve their goals.


2.1 Improve the delivery of academic advising and support services to students in order to increase retention and student success.

2.1.1 Develop registration incentives for returning program-placed students, who have met the advising requirement.

2.1.2 Develop a holistic model of student support services for distance learning students, by implementing the QEP.

2.1.3 Increase access to financial aid and scholarship assistance for students who demonstrate financial need.

2.1.4 Increase the number of continuing students who maintain momentum in their academic studies – “progress”.

2.2 Publish program-specific measurable student learning outcomes that demonstrate to four-year colleges/universities and potential employers the knowledge, skills, and abilities of graduates.

2.3 Expand student development (SDV) courses to include enforcing earlier enrollment, life skills, professional exploration, and expanding the pool/expertise of faculty teaching student development.

2.3.1 Require all curricular students to complete SDV 100 or equivalent within the first 15 credits.

2.3.2 Create a school/discipline-based SDV 101 course for each school that would focus on careers in the school’s disciplines.

2.3.3 Explore automatically registering new students in SDV 100 or an equivalent course.

2.3.4 Expand the pool of qualified faculty by utilizing business/industry experts for instruction or supplemental instruction to broaden students’ insight in career choices.

2.4 Enhance the college’s information, processes, and systems to work more effectively with large numbers of students and adjunct faculty.

2.5 Improve the success of students in courses and programs by implementing new instructional techniques.

2.5.1 Research successful teaching and learning strategies and practices that can be replicated in other classes and disciplines.

2.5.2 Develop and implement programs for faculty that focus on and engage them in discipline-specific methodologies in teaching and learning.

2.5.3 Develop and implement a comprehensive faculty training program for faculty who are teaching or who plan to teach distance learning courses, by implementing the QEP.

2.6 Improve developmental studies instruction and support services.

2.7 Increase the number of graduates, transfer students, and students completing a workforce credential.

2.7.1 Increase the number of completing students who make a successful transition to/at work or successful transfer to a four-year college or professional school – “completion”.

2.8 Increase student engagement through the offering of out-of-classroom activities.


3.0 COMMUNITY AND WORKFORCE LEADERSHIP 
Help shape the future of the greater Richmond region by developing innovative programs that foster community growth and economic development.


3.1 Enhance the college’s academic curricula and workforce development training to reflect the requirements of the region’s economy.

3.2 Expand access to the college’s academic curricula and workforce development training.

3.2.1 Continuously increase credit and non-credit enrollments.

3.2.2 Increase the number of underserved population students in credit courses.

3.2.3 Increase the number of employers served with contract training.

3.2.4 Develop a plan to integrate Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA) offerings and academic programs.

3.3 Expand the college’s career planning and placement services to build stronger connections among the region’s employers and the college’s academic curricula and workforce development training.

3.3.1 Increase the number of career planning and placement services offered to students through closer collaboration with the academic programs and advisers.

3.3.2 Increase the number of employers in the career planning and placement services database.

3.3.3 Provide students with incentives for completing degrees and achieving workforce certifications.

3.3.4 Require in each occupational/technical program, some type of experiential learning and/or career exploration opportunity with business, industry, or government entities to improve students’ awareness of career choices.

3.4 Continue to serve as a key leader in the region’s community and economic development activities.

3.5 Serve as a model organization for the Greater Richmond region by becoming a great place to learn, teach, and work.